Eulogy of Abraham Lincoln: Before the General Assembly of Connecticut, at Allyn Hall, Hartford, Thursday, June 8th, 1865

Front Cover
A.N. Clark & Company, State Printers, 1865 - Funeral sermons - 58 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 31 - And I looked, and behold a pale horse : and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him. And power was given unto them over the fourth part of the earth, to kill with sword, and with hunger, and with death, and with the beasts of the earth.
Page 23 - Now. in my view of the present aspect of affairs, there need be no bloodshed or war. There is no necessity for it. I am not in favor of such a course, and I may say, in advance, that there will be no bloodshed unless it be forced upon the Government, and then it will be compelled to act in self-defence.
Page 12 - Duncan is in his grave; After life's fitful fever he sleeps well; Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further.
Page 26 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government, and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects there will be no invasion, no using of force against or among the people anywhere.
Page 18 - Washington, after witnessing his intercourse with all classes of people, including governors, senators, members of Congress, officers of the army, and familiar friends, I cannot recollect to have heard him relate a circumstance to any one of them all that would have been out of place if uttered in a lady's drawing-room.
Page 49 - And I further declare and make known that such persons, of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted" by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God.
Page 16 - ... which entitle him to the personal respect of the people. On the only social occasion on which I ever had the honor to be in his company, viz., the Commemoration at Gettysburg, he sat at the table of my friend David Wills, by the side of several distinguished persons, foreigners and Americans; and in gentlemanly appearance, manners and conversation, he was the peer of any man at the table.
Page 18 - I should state, that during the entire period of my stay in Washington, after witnessing his intercourse with nearly all classes of men, embracing governors, senators, members of Congress, officers of the army, and intimate friends, I cannot recollect to have heard him relate a circumstance to any one of them, which would have been out of place uttered in a ladies
Page 58 - His fame will grow brighter and grander as it descends the ages, and posterity will regard him as the incarnation of democracy in its pure childhood, as the embodiment of those ideas of universal emancipation which were the glory of its faithful epoch. ..." When the race shall have finally climbed...
Page 16 - The teeth are white and regular, and it is only when a. smile, radiant, captivating and winning as was ever given to mortal, transfigures the plain countenance, that you begin to realize that it is not impossible for artists to admire and woman to love it.

Bibliographic information