Harper's Magazine, Volume 100

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Harper's Magazine Company, 1900 - American literature
Important American periodical dating back to 1850.
 

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Page 417 - And how hear we every man in our own tongue, wherein we were born? Parthians, and Medes, and Elamites, and the dwellers in Mesopotamia, and in Judea, and Cappadocia, in Pontus, and Asia, Phrygia, and Pamphylia, in Egypt, and in the parts of Libya about Cyrene, and strangers of Rome, Jews and proselytes, Cretes and Arabians, we do hear them speak in our tongues the wonderful works of God.
Page 318 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans, fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low-water mark. It seals the union of two nations, who, in conjunction, can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment we must marry ourselves to the British fleet and nation.
Page 30 - HALF a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. " Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns," he said: Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred.
Page 417 - And they were all amazed, and marvelled, saying one to another, Behold, are not all these which speak Galileans ? And how hear we every man in our own tongue, wherein we were born ? Parthians, and Medes, and Elamites, and the dwellers in Mesopotamia, and in Judea, and...
Page 156 - States, to which the youths of fortune and talents from all parts thereof may be sent for the completion of their education, in all the branches of polite literature, in arts and sciences, in acquiring knowledge in the principles of politics and good government, and, as a matter of infinite importance in my judgment, by associating with each other, and forming friendships in juvenile years, be enabled to free themselves in a proper degree from those local prejudices and habitual jealousies which...
Page 317 - There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans, through which the produce of threeeighths of our territory must pass to market...
Page 41 - ... was she doing? Lamenting because the papers hadn't been destroyed and the money kept! Is theft better than lying? That point lost its sting— the lie dropped into the background and left comfort behind it. The next point came to the front: Had he rendered that service? Well, here was Goodson's own evidence as reported in Stephenson's letter; there could be no better evidence than that— it was even proof that he had rendered it.
Page 315 - September last, shall be disposed of for the common benefit of the United States and be settled and formed into distinct republican States, which shall become members of the Federal Union and have the same rights of sovereignty, freedom and independence as the other States...
Page 38 - I've been one all my life, without knowing it. Let no man call me honest again— I will not have it." "I— well, Mary, I feel a good deal as you do; I certainly do. It seems strange, too, so strange. I never could have believed it— never." A long silence followed; both were sunk in thought. At last the wife looked up and said: "I know what you are thinking, Edward.
Page 310 - The Assistant Commissioners guarantee in the fullest manner, on the part of the British Government, to the Emigrant Farmers beyond the Vaal River, the right to manage their own affairs and to govern themselves according to their own laws, without any interference on the part of the British Government...

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