New Grammar School History of the United States: To which are Added the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States : with Notes, Questions, and Explanations ...

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E. Maynard & Company, 1889 - United States - 414 pages
 

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Page 348 - He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States ; for that purpose obstructing the laws for the naturalization of foreigners, refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither and raising the conditions of new appropriations of lands.
Page 27 - And ne'er shall the sons of Columbia be slaves, While the earth bears a plant, or the sea rolls its waves.
Page 48 - We found the people most gentle, loving, and faithful, void of all guile and treason and such as lived after the manner of the Golden Age.
Page 153 - You know the rest. In the books you have read, How the British Regulars fired and fled, — How the farmers gave them ball for ball, From behind each fence and farm-yard wall, Chasing the red-coats down the lane, Then crossing the fields to emerge again Under the trees at the turn of the road, And only pausing to fire and load.
Page 200 - Filling a glass, he turned to them and said, "with a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy, as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 96 - ... taken on either side, but all shall be openness and love. I will not call you children, for parents sometimes chide their children too severely ; nor brothers only, for brothers differ. The friendship between me and you I will not compare to a chain, for that the rains might rust, or the falling tree might break. We are the same as if one man's body were to be divided into two parts; we are all one flesh and blood.
Page 232 - This accession of territory strengthens forever the power of the United States ; and I have just given to England a maritime rival that will sooner or later humble her pride.
Page 179 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never, never, never!
Page 20 - ... to the middle of the river Apalachicola, or Catahouche ; thence along the middle thereof to its junction with the Flint river ; thence straight to the head of St. Mary's river ; and thence down along the middle of St. Mary's river to the Atlantic ocean.

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