The Civil War and the Constitution 1859-1865, Vol. 2

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2005 - History - 384 pages
It could be argued that the Civil War was the most influential event in the history of the United States. In The Civil War and the Constitution, political scientist John W. Burgess explores the politics, people, and sentiments of this time, and closely examines the constitutional issues of the Civil War. Volume 2 of this two-volume work covers battles in New Orleans, Kentucky, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Atlanta, and Charleston, as well as Sherman's march through Georgia. The Emancipation Proclamation is discussed in great depth, along with constitutional issues created by the military events of 1862 and 1863. JOHN W. BURGESS, Ph.D., LL.D., was a professor of political science and constitutional law and dean of the faculty of political science at Columbia University in New York.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
7
III
44
IV
61
V
72
VI
89
VII
97
VIII
106
XIV
157
XV
180
XVI
206
XVII
214
XVIII
234
XIX
247
XX
261
XXI
271

IX
114
X
119
XI
131
XII
134
XIII
146
XXII
288
XXIII
315
XXIV
321
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 99 - That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the states and parts of states, if any, in which the people thereof respectively shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any state, or the people thereof, shall on that day be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States, by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such...
Page 98 - ... that on the first day of january in the year of our lord one thousand eight hundred and sixtythree all persons held as slaves within any state or designated part of a state the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the united states shall be then thenceforward and forever free...
Page 115 - And I further declare and make known that such persons, of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.
Page 86 - That, on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever, free...
Page 79 - Resolved, That the United States ought to cooperate with any State which may adopt gradual abolishment of slavery, giving to such State pecuniary aid, to be used by such State in its discretion, to compensate for the inconveniences, public and private, produced by such change of system.
Page 115 - ... the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof respectively are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: "Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St.
Page 114 - Now, therefore, I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority...
Page 98 - I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States of America, and Commander-in-chief of the Army and Navy thereof, do hereby proclaim and declare that hereafter, as heretofore, the war will be • prosecuted for the object of practically restoring the constitutional relation between the United States and each of the states, and the people thereof, in which that relation is, or may be, suspended or disturbed.
Page 115 - Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the fortyeight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of...

About the author (2005)

JOHN W. BURGESS, Ph.D., LL.D., was a professor of political science and constitutional law and dean of the faculty of political science at Columbia University in New York.

Bibliographic information