The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being the Letters of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, John Adams, John Jay, Arthur Lee, William Lee, Ralph Izard, Francis Dana, William Carmichael, Henry Laurens, John Laurens, M. de Lafayette, M. Dumas, and Others, Concerning the Foreign Relations of the United States During the Whole Revolution; Together with the Letters in Reply from the Secret Committee of Congress, and the Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Also, the Entire Correspondence of the French Ministers, Gerard and Luzerne, with Congress, Volume 2

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N. Hale and Gray & Bowen, 1829 - United States
 

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Page 164 - It is likewise agreed that it shall be wholly free for all merchants, commanders of ships and other citizens of both countries to manage themselves their own business in all the ports and places subject to the jurisdiction of each other, as well with respect to the consignment and sale of their goods and...
Page 167 - It shall be lawful for the ships of war of either party, and privateers, freely to carry whithersoever they please, the ships and goods taken from their enemies...
Page 168 - States, who have commissions from any other prince or state in enmity with either nation, to fit their ships in the ports of either the one or the other of the aforesaid parties, to sell what they have taken, or in any other manner whatsoever to exchange their ships...
Page 169 - ... although the whole lading or any part thereof should appertain to the enemies of either (contraband goods being always excepted).
Page 168 - ... It shall be lawful for all and singular the subjects of the Most Christian King, and the citizens, people and inhabitants of the said United States, to sail with their ships with all manner of liberty and security, no distinction being made who are the proprietors of the merchandizes laden thereon, from any port to the places of those who now are or hereafter shall be at enmity with the Most Christian King or the United States.
Page 119 - SIR, — I received the letter you did me the honor to write me on the...
Page 97 - It was stated, in an article of the treaty of alliance, to be its direct end, " to maintain effectually the liberty, sovereignty, and independence, absolute and unlimited, of the -United States, as well in matters of government as commerce.
Page 167 - ... no shelter or refuge shall be given in their ports to such as shall have made prize of the subjects, people, or property of either of the parties ; but if such shall come in, being forced by stress of weather, or the danger of the sea, all proper means shall be vigorously used, that they go out and retire from thence as soon as possible.
Page 169 - ... must be furnished with sea letters or passports, expressing the name, property, and bulk of the ship, as also the name and place of habitation of the master or commander of the said ship, that it may appear...
Page 166 - ... shall forbear doing any damage to those of the other party, or committing any outrage against them; and if they act to the contrary they shall be punished, and shall also be bound in their persons and estates to make satisfaction and reparation for all damages, and the interest thereof, of whatever nature the said damages may be.

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