Edgar Allan Poe

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Sterling Publishing Company, Inc., 1995 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 48 pages
"Gr. 5 Up...spacious format; a wide variety of poems; and colorful, interpretive illustrations...."--SLJ. "The format is admirable: a handsome sampler of poems, with a short introductory essay, unfamiliar words briefly defined in footnotes, and a few prefatory sentences for each poem to establish context and aid interpretation. 13 of Poe's more accessible poems appear here, including The Raven, ' The Bells, ' Eldorado, ' and Annabel Lee.'...concludes with passages from short stories that highlight Poe's mastery of prose....Cobleigh provides atmospheric art: an arresting picture of The Raven, ' a cadaverous ghoul in The Bells, ' and a depiction of the narrator of The Tell-Tale Heart' as a deranged Wee Willy Winky."--Kirkus Reviews. ." . . creepy, unnerving, chilling, and fascinating. . ."--Buzz Weekly. 48 pages (all in color), 8 1/2 x 10.

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User Review  - Whisper1 - LibraryThing

When in college, a professor who taught American Literature, loved Edgar Allan Poe. I confess that I wasn't drawn to his writings back then, nor am I particularly enamored today. But, I very much like ... Read full review

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User Review  - cscapp1 - LibraryThing

I liked this book but I felt like it had some flaws. This is a good collection for younger readers who have not been introduced to Edgar Allen Poe. As always, Poe’s stories are creepy and come from a ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
4
The Lake
12
To Helen
19
Eldorado
28
EulalieA Song
34
From The Masque of the Red Death
40
From HopFrog
46
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts on January 19, 1809. In 1827, he enlisted in the United States Army and his first collection of poems, Tamerlane and Other Poems, was published. In 1835, he became the editor of the Southern Literary Messenger. Over the next ten years, Poe would edit a number of literary journals including the Burton's Gentleman's Magazine and Graham's Magazine in Philadelphia and the Broadway Journal in New York City. It was during these years that he established himself as a poet, a short story writer, and an editor. His works include The Fall of the House of Usher, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Mystery of Marie Roget, A Descent into the Maelstrom, The Masque of the Red Death, and The Raven. He struggle with depression and alcoholism his entire life and died on October 7, 1849 at the age of 40.

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