Democratic Education Stretched Thin: How Complexity Challenges a Liberal Ideal

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Feb 22, 2007 - Education - 260 pages
Is a democratic education promoting the ideals of human equality and individual liberty still tenable in a postmodern world of increasingly diverse and competing interests? Drawing on contemporary political theorists, including Michael Walzer and John Rawls, and also on philosophers such as Descartes and Hume, David J. Blacker addresses this question, outlining the dispute between orthodoxy and proceduralism, and proposing a new approach of liberal contextualism to resolve the impasse and enrich our conception of democratic education. He discusses a wide range of controversies surrounding students’ constitutional rights, religion in public schools, special education, civic and moral education, sex education, students’ citizenship status, and educational accountability, and argues for change at both the institutional and personal levels. He concludes that democratic education must be allowed to connect with how individuals understand the ultimate aims and purposes of their lives.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2007)

David J. Blacker is Professor of Philosophy of Education and Legal Studies at the University of Delaware and the author of Dying to Teach: The Educator’s Search for Immortality.

Bibliographic information