Women and the Historical Enterprise in America: Gender, Race, and the Politics of Memory, 1880-1945

Front Cover
UNC Press Books, 2003 - History - 380 pages
In Women and the Historical Enterprise in America, Julie Des Jardins explores American women's participation in the practice of history from the late nineteenth century through the end of World War II, a period in which history became professionali
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

From Feminine Refinement to Masculine Pursuit 18801920
13
Social Activism and Interdisciplinarity in Writing and Teaching 19101935
52
Perspectives from the Professional Social and Geographic Margins
89
Women Regionalists and Intercultural Brokers
91
African American Womans Historical Consciousness
118
Constructing Usable Pasts
143
Womanist Consciousness and New Negro History
145
Remembering Organized Feminism
177
Establishing Womens History as a Field
215
Creating a Usable Past for Women
217
Legacies for Womens History in the TwentyFirst Century
241
Notes
271
Bibliography
325
Index
365
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 340 - The Treatment of the Negro in American History School Textbooks, A Comparison of Changing Textbook Content 1826 to 1939, with Developing Scholarship in the History of the Negro in the United States (Menasha: Wisconsin, George Banta Publishing Company, 1941).
Page 351 - A History of the Position of Dean of Women in a Selected Group of Co-educational Colleges and Universities in the United States.

About the author (2003)

Julie Des Jardins is professor of history at Baruch College, City University of New York.

Bibliographic information