Democracy and the Japanese Government

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Arbor Press, 1920 - Japan - 97 pages
 

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Page 1 - Existing legal enactments, such as laws, regulations, Ordinances, or by whatever names they may be called, shall, so far as they do not conflict with the present Constitution, continue in force.
Page 12 - This was a bicameral institution, consisting of a House of Peers and a House of Representatives. The upper chamber was made up of the imperial family and hereditary peers selected by a process of 'in-group election...
Page 1 - The respective Ministers of State shall give their advice to the Emperor, and be responsible for it. All Laws, Imperial Ordinances, and Imperial Rescripts of whatever kind, that relate to the affairs of the State,- require the countersignature of a Minister of State.
Page 2 - In some countries, the cabinet is regarded as constituting a corporate body, the ministers are not held to take part in the conduct of the government each one in an individual capacity, but joint responsibility is the rule. The evil of such a system is that the power of party combination will ultimately over-rule the supreme power of the Sovereign. Such a state of things can never be approved of according to our constitution.
Page 22 - Those already fixed expenditures based by the Constitution upon the powers appertaining to the Emperor, and such expenditures as may have arisen by the effect of law, or that appertain to the legal obligations of the Government, shall be neither rejected nor reduced by the Imperial Diet, without the concurrence of the Government.
Page 2 - Such a state of things can never be approved of according to our constitution. But with regard to important internal and external matters of state, the whole government is concerned, and no single department can, therefore, be exclusively charged with the conduct of them. As to the expediency of such matters and as to the mode of carrying them out, all the ministers of state shall take united counsel, and none of them is allowed to leave his share of the business a burden upon his colleagues. In...
Page 5 - ... the absolute necessity there is in the conduct of the affairs of this country, that there should be an avowed and real minister, possessing the chief weight in the council, and the principal place in the confidence of the king. In that respect there can be no rivalry or division of power.
Page 16 - The House of Representatives is composed of members elected by the people of the several States, for the term of two years.
Page 22 - Already fixed expenditures based by the Constitution upon the powers appertaining to the Emperor" include all the expenditures which are based upon the sovereign powers of the Emperor, as set forth in Chapter I. of the Constitution, to wit : ordinary expenditures required by the organization of the different branches of the administration, and by that of the Army and Navy, the salaries of all civil and military officers and expenditures that may be required in consequence of treaties concluded with...

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