The Village Doctors, and Other Tales

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Godey & McMichael, Publishers' Hall, no. 101 Chestnut Street, 1843 - 72 pages

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Page 69 - Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. But his delight is in the law of the LORD; and in his law doth he meditate day and night.
Page 30 - Greatness and goodness are not means, but ends ! Hath he not always treasures, always friends, The good great man ? Three treasures, love, and light, And calm thoughts regular as infant's breath : And three firm friends, more sure than day and night, Himself, his Maker, and the angel Death.
Page 41 - He that lacks time to mourn, lacks time to mend. Eternity mourns that. 'Tis an ill cure For life's worst ills, to have no time to feel them. Where sorrow 's held intrusive and turned out, There wisdom will not enter, nor true power, Nor aught that dignifies humanity.
Page 30 - The moving accident is not my trade; To freeze the blood I have no ready arts: 'Tis my delight, alone in summer shade, To pipe a simple song for thinking hearts.
Page 69 - BLESSED is the man that hath not walked in the counsel of the ungodly, nor stood in the way of sinners, and hath not sat in the seat of the scornful...
Page 63 - O'ER wayward childhood would'st thou hold firm rule, And sun thee in the light of happy faces ; Love, Hope, and Patience, these must be thy graces, And in thine own heart let them first keep school.
Page 14 - ... the soldier at his musket, and the priest at his prayers And lo ! in a flash of crimson splendour, with blazing scarlet clouds running before his chariot, and heralding his majestic approach, God's sun rises upon the world, and all nature wakens and brightens.
Page 26 - Well, well, — she's gone, And I have tamed my sorrow. Pain and grief Are transitory things no less than joy, And though they leave us not the men we were, Yet they do leave us. You behold me here A man bereaved, with something of a blight Upon the early blossoms of his life And its first verdure, having not the less A living root, and drawing from the earth Its vital juices, from the air its powers : And surely as man's health and strength are whole His appetites regerminate, his heart Re-opens,...
Page 47 - She should have died hereafter ; There would have been a time for such a word. To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day To the last syllable of recorded time, And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death.
Page 14 - What gracious forethought is it — what generous and loving provision, that deigns to prepare for our eyes and to soothe our hearts with such a splendid morning festival ! For these magnificent bounties of Heaven to us, let us be thankful, even that we can feel thankful ; (for thanks surely is the noblest effort, as it is the greatest delight, of the gentle soul,) and so, a grace for this feast, let all say who partake of it.

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