The Writings of George Washington, Volume 11

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G.P. Putnam' Sons, 1891 - Presidents
 

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Page 381 - In this conflict of emotions, all I dare aver, is, that it has been my faithful study to collect my duty from a just appreciation of every circumstance by which it might be affected.
Page 384 - Such being the impressions under which I have, in obedience to the public summons, repaired to the present station, it would be peculiarly improper to omit in this first official act my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the universe; who presides in the councils of nations; and whose Providential aid can supply every human defect...
Page 456 - To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace. A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined ; to which end, a uniform and...
Page 282 - No colony in America was ever settled under such favorable auspices as that which has just commenced at Muskingum.
Page 62 - I never mean, unless some particular circumstances should compel me to it, to possess another slave by purchase, it being among my first wishes to see some plan adopted by which slavery in this country may be abolished by law.
Page 383 - ... of former instances, or by an affectionate sensibility to this transcendent proof of the confidence of my fellowcitizens, and have thence too little consulted my incapacity as well as disinclination for the weighty and untried cares before me, my error will be palliated by the motives which misled me, and its consequences be judged by my country, with some share of the partiality in which they originated.
Page 474 - That Congress have no authority to interfere in the emancipation of slaves, or in the treatment of them in any of the States; it remaining with the several States alone to provide rules and regulations therein, which humanity and true policy may require.
Page 77 - You talk, my good sir, of employing influence to appease the present tumults in Massachusetts. I know not where that influence is to be found, or, if attainable, that it would be a proper remedy for the disorders. Influence is not government. Let us have a government by which our lives, liberties and properties will be secured, or let us know the worst at once.
Page 385 - ... genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy, and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity ; since we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained ; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment...
Page 234 - SIR, I have received the letter, which your Excellency did me the honor to address to me on the...

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