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to the government. It is deeply to be regretted, that this department of the government cannot, upon constitutional grounds, concur with the legislative department in this last measure proposed to attain these desirable objects. Owing to the brief space between the period of the death of my lamented predecessor and my own installation into office, I was, in fact, not left time to prepare and submit a definite recommendation of my own, in my regular message; and since, my mind has been wholly occupied in a most anxious attempt to conform my action to the legislative will. In this communication, I am confined by the constitution to my objections simply to this bill; but the period of the regular session will soon arrive, when it will be my duty, under another clause of the constitution, “to give to the Congress information of the state of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as I shall judge necessary and expedient.” And I most respectfully submit, in a spirit of harmony, whether the present differences of opinion should be pressed further at this time, and whether the peculiarity of my situation does not entitle me to a postponement of this subject to a more auspicious period for deliberation. The two houses of Con. gress have distinguished themselves, at this extraordinary session, by the performance of an immense mass of labor, at a season very unfavorable both to the health and action; and have passed many laws, which, I trust, will prove highly beneficial to the interests of the country, and fully answer its just expectations. It has been my good fortune and pleasure to concur with them in all measures, except this. And why should our difference on this alone be pushed to extremes ? It is my anxious desire that it should not be. I, too, have been burdened with extraordinary labors of late, and I sincerely desire time for deep and deliberate reflection on this the greatest difficulty of my administration. May we not now pause, until a more favorable time, when, with the most anxious hope that the executive and Congress may cordially unite, some measure of finance may be deliberately adopted, promotive of the good of our common country?

I will take this occasion to declare that the conclusions to which I have brought myself, are those of a settled conviction, founded, in my opinion, on a just view of the constitution; that, in arriving at it, I have been actuated by no other motive or desire, than to uphold the institutions of the country, as they have come down to us from the hands of our godlike ancestors; and that I shall esteem my efforts to sustain them, even though I perish, more honorable than to win the applause of men by a sacrifice of my duty and my conscience.

STATISTICAL TABLES.

Extra Sessions of Congress.

Congress has been called together on extraordinary occasions nineteen times since the formation of the government, as fol lows:

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Mr. Van Buren’s call was made in the spring of 1837, and Congress was convened the first Monday in September of the same year. President Harrison, on the 17th of March, 1841, called Congress to gether on the last Monday in May, 1841.

Governors of the several States and Territories, With their Salaries, Terms of Office, and Expiration of their respective

Terms; the Number of Senators and Representatives in the State Legis. latures, with their respective Terms..

States.

Sena-
tors.
Term,
years.
Repre-
senta-
tives.
Term,
I years.

Gov.
Governors.

Salary. Terma, Term expires.

years. Maine, John Fairfield, 1,500 Jan. 1843 31 1 200 1 N. H. Henry Hubbard, 1,200 June,1843 12 1 250 1 Vt. Charles Paine,

750 Oct. 1842 30 1233 1 Mass. John Davis,

3,6663 1 Jan. 1843 401 356 1 R. I. Samuel W. King, 400

1 May, 1843 10 1 72 Conn. C. F. Cleavland, 1,100 May, 1843 21 1 208 N. Y. Wm. H. Seward, 4,000 2 Jan. 1844 32 4 128 1 N. J. Wm. Pennington, 2,000 1 Oct. 1843 1411 501 Penn. David R. Porter, 4,000 3 Jan. 1845 33 3 100 1 Del. William B. Cooper, 1,3331 3 Jan. 1844 94 21 2 Md. Francis Thomas, 4,200 3 Jan. 1845 21 5 79 1 Va. J. Rutherford, Act. 3,333}| 3 Mar. 1842 32 4 134 1 N. C. J. M. Morehead, 2,000 2 Jan. 1843 50 2 120 2 S. C. J. P. Richardson, 3,500 2 Dec. 1842 45 4 124 2 Ga. Ch. J. McDonald,

4,000 2 Nov. 1843 30 1 207 1 Ala. Benj. Fitzpatrick, 3,500 2 Dec. 1843 30 3 100 1 Miss. T. X. Tucker, 3,000 2 Jan. 1844 304 91 2 La. A. B. Roman, 7,500 | 4 Jan. 1843 174 50 2 Ark. Archibald Yell, 2,000 Nov. 1844 174 54 2 Tenn. James C. Jones, 2,000 2 Oct. 1843 25 2 752 Ken. Robert P. Letcher, 2,500

4 Sept. 1844 38

100 1 Ohio, Thomas Corwin, 1,500 2 Dec. 1842 36 2 72 1 Mich. John S. Barry, 2,000 2 Jan. 1844 18 2 53 | 2 Ind. Samuel Bigger, 1,500 3 Dec. 1843 30 3 62 2 lll. Thomas Carlin, 1,500 Dec. 1842 404 91 2 Mo. Thomas Reynolds, 2,000 4 Nov. 1844 18 4 49 2 Territo. Flor. Richard K. Call, 2,500 | 3 Dec. 1844 11 2 29 1 Wisc. James D. Doty, 2,500 3 May, 1844 13 4 26 2 Iowa, John Chambers, 2,500 | 3 | July, 1844 | 13/ 2 26 1

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In all the states, except New Jersey, Virginia, and South Carolina, the governor is voted for by the people; and, if no one has a majority of all the votes, in the states in which such a majority is required, the legislature elects to the office of governor one of the candidates voted for by the people.

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ANNUAL EXPENDITURE, AND LOSSES BY PUBLIC DEFALCATIONS,

UNDER EACH ADMINISTRATION, FROM 1789 TO 1837.
Statement in Relation to the Revenue of the United States, derived from Customs, Internal Revenue, Direct Tax, and Sales of Public

Lands, from 4th March, 1789, to 4th March, 1837; exhibiting, also, the Number of Officers employed in collecting the same; the
Amount of Defalcations, and the Ratio of Losses to the Number of Defaulters, and to the Amounts collected; with General Results ;
arranged in Periods of Four Years each.

No. of De-
faulters in
each Year.

Amount of Defalcation in each Year.

Amount of Receipts in each Year.

Year.

Collectors of Customs.

Collectors of Internal Re-
venue and Direct Tax.
Receivers of Land Sales. 155
Whole Number of Defaulters

in each Year.

Collectors

of
Customs.

Collectors of Internal
Revenue and Direct

.
Тах,

Receivers

of Public
Money from Sales of
Lands.

Aggregate
Amount of
Defalcation in
each Period.

Whole Number employed in

each Year. Average Number employed in

each Period. Ratio per cent of Defaulters to

Average employed,

Ratio of Loss per Head to Av.

erage employed.

Aggregate
Amount of Re-
ceipts in each

Period.

Internal Reve-
nue and Direct Sales of Lands.

Tax. .

Ratio of Loss per $100 to ag; gregate Receipts in each Period.

Customs.

1789
1790
1791
1792)
1793)
1794
17953
1796 31
1797| 4
1798 1
1799] 3
1800
1801
1802 4
1803) 1l
18041 21

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102

12,936,487.041 43,631.06; 540,193.801 18065 45,955.49 2,090.26

102

14,667,698.17 75,865.31 765,245.73 1807 23, 179.04

102

15,845,521.61 47,783.96 466,163.27 1808 28 157,865.11 8,806.17

247,278.70 107 10338.83 2,400.76) 16,363,550.58 27,369.94 647,939.06 62,427,449.53.39 1809 1 9 10 913.39 2,848.97

194

7,296,020.58

11,561.70 442,252.33 18101 1 7 81 107,011.08 6,090.16

105

8,583,309.31

19,879.31 696,548.82 1811 31 53 561 41,130.25 10,876.57

110

13,313,222,73

9,962.61 1,040,237.53
1812
8
3,867.70

172,738.12 110107 76.63 1,664.00 8,958,777.53 5,762.28 710,427.78 41,087,962.51.43
1813| 4
4 12,544.29

110

13,224,623.25 8,560.56 835,655.14 10 2,951.61 2,300.18

318

5,998,772.08 3,882, 482.18 1,135,971.09
1815/ 2
10 38,640.55 5,050.69

320

7,282,942.22 6,840,732.48 1,287,959.28
9 11 14,764.51 10,578.54

86,870.37 320 267 13.48 330.56 36,306,874.88 9,378,343.40 1717,985.03 87,900,901.59 .10
1817 31 1 4

321

26,283,348.49 4,512,287.81| 1,991,226.06 1818 81 9 36,893.45 23,939.96

326

17,176,385.00 1,219,612.56 2,606,564.77 1819 2 311 1 34 11,483.99 84,883.48 5,967.32

119

20,283,608.76 313,244.41 3,274,422.78
18201 3 8 2 13 124,142.42 36,129.48 37,413.18 400,022.44 122 222 27.02 1,801.90 15,005,612.15 137,847.35 1,635,871.61 94,440,031.75.42
1821) 1 6 21 1,383.34 27,981.23 20,579.44

129

13,004,447.15 98,376.68 1,212,966.46 1822 3 10 11 14 50,668.36 22,413.15 6,460,41

131

17,589,761.94 88,617.27 1,803,581.54 1823 1 71 1 22,325.31 75,457.48 4,093.95

128

19,088,433.44 44,579.88 916,523,10
1824 2 1 17,429.03 3,968.76 1,044.79 253,805.25 133 1302 .46 1,967.39 17,878,325.71 40,865.33 984,418.15 72,750,896.65 .35
1825 12 1 13
14,931.10 357.19

133

20,098,713.45 28,102.20 1,216,090.56 18261 3 21 6 73,170.35 18,174.24 21,458.60

133

23,341,331.77 28,228.69 1,393,785.09
18271 2 3 3 8 1,412.601 1,381.67 12,670.07

133

19,712,283.29 22,512.58 1,495,845.26
1828 1 4 6 262.81 17,867.60 28,035.57 189,721.80 133 133 24.82 1,449.00 23,205,523.64 19,670.35 1,018,308.75 91,580,395.63| .20
1829 8 4 1 13 147,257.42 7,703.87 3,558.30

134

22,681,965.91 25,837.79| 1,517,175.13
1830 21 3 3

137

21,922,391.39 29,141.21 2,329,356.14 1831 1,702.45 434.72

142

24,224,441.77 17,439.52 3,219,815.48 3,805.17

184,444.65 142 139 18.70 1,326.94 28,405,237.24 18,421.78 2,623,381.03107,065,604.39.17 1833 1

154

29,032,508.91 3,153.12 3,967,682.55 1834 21

132.00 159

16,214,957.15 4,215.89 4,857,600.69 1835 2 5,805.72 21,828.70 56,904.51

164

19,391,310.591 14,722.81|14,757,600.75 1836] 2 6 3,755.66

122,929.03 214,648.03 169 161 11.18 1,335.08 23,409,940.53 - 1,098.79 24,877,179.86 136,531,971.64.15 Total|87|243|27| 357|1,198,979.91 442,265.76/397,304.142,038,549.81)

|682,957,754.47]34,995,340.02 89,087,314.771807,040,439.26) .25

W 1814 3

* 1816 2

-ఎలుని నిలు ట ట ల అనం టెకం. 330

18051 21 9,382.63

5,590.49 33,578.67

1,396.94 404.63 18,181.15

638.81 1,998.34

655.26

1832

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