Hints on Sea-Risks; containing some practical suggestions for diminishing maritime losses, etc

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Page 51 - When Steam-Vessels on different courses must unavoidably or necessarily cross so near that by continuing their respective courses, there would be a risk of coming in collision, each Vessel shall put her HELM TO PORT, so as always to pass on the LARBOARD side of each other. " A Steam-Vessel passing another in a narrow channel, must always leave the Vessel she is passing on the LARBOARD hand.
Page 51 - That when both vessels have the wind large or a-beam, and meet, they shall pass each other in the same way on the larboard hand, to effect which two last-mentioned objects the helm must be put to port...
Page 50 - October, 1840. The attention of this corporation having been directed to the numerous, severe, and in some instances fatal accidents which have resulted from the collision of vessels navigated by steam ; and it appearing to be indispensably necessary in order to guard against the recurrence of similar calamities that a regulation should be established for the guidance and government of persons...
Page 4 - Barometer, rathei •erve to mislead, than to inform ; for the changes of weather depend rather on the rising and falling of the mercury, than on its standing at any particular height. When the mercury is as high as " fair," and the surface of it is concave, (which is the case when it begins to descend,) it very often rains ; and on the contrary, when the mercury is opposite "rain...
Page 92 - ... hurricane, from a summary of which I think myself at liberty to draw the following practical inference — namely, that had we instantly attended to the timely warning of the barometer, by bringing the ship to the wind, and making preparations for the storm, instead of scudding before it until we could scud no longer, we should have escaped with as little injury as the two ships I have just alluded to ; and that, had the three unfortunate ships which foundered in the storm pursued a similar course,...
Page xv - Its general source is between north and northeast, and its most usual continuance about fifteen or twenty hours, with heavy squalls, and terrible thunder, lightning, and rain, at intervals : but the bora most feared, and with justice, is that which blows in sudden gusts for three days, subsides, and then resumes its former force for three days more.
Page 51 - And as steam vessels may be considered in the light of vessels navigating with a fair wind and should give way to sailing vessels on a wind on either tack it becomes only necessary to provide a rule for their observance when meeting other steamers or sailing vessels going large.
Page 64 - ... second at four feet, the third at nine feet, and the lowest at sixteen feet, in the flat part of her bilge; that hole at four feet deep would leak or let in as much water again, in the same time, as that at one foot ; and that at nine feet, three times as much ; and that at sixteen feet, four times as much...
Page iii - That the annual loss of life, occasioned by the wreck or foundering of British vessels at sea, may, on the same grounds, be fairly estimated at not less than one thousand persons in each year, which loss is also attended with increased pecuniary burdens to the British public, on whom the support of many of the widows and orphans left destitute by such losses must ultimately fall.
Page xv - Of these winds the most noted is the Bora. This word seems to be a corruption of Boreas, though said to be derived from a Sclavonic term for "furious tempest." The Bora is greatly dreaded in the upper part of the Gulf of Venice, where it rushes down from the whole line of the Julian Alps with such irresistible fury that not only numbers of vessels are sacrificed but it ravages the shore also, being feared as much for the suddenness of its attack as for its violence. Entire districts are rendered...

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