Military Essays and Recollections: Papers Read Before the Commandery of the State of Illinois, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States ...

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Page 183 - Now we are engaged in a great civil war testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
Page 73 - SIR :—Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of Commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.
Page 306 - He shall not drop." said my uncle Toby, firmly. "A-well-o'day, do what we can for him, said Trim, maintaining his point,; "the poor soul will die." "He shall not die, by G— !" cried my uncle Toby. The Accusing Spirit, which flew up to heaven's chancery with the oath, blushed as he gave it in, and the Recording Angel, as he wrote it down, dropped a tear upon the word, and blotted it out for ever.
Page 73 - SIR :—In consideration of all the circumstances governing the present situation of affairs at this station, I propose to the Commanding Officer of the Federal forces the appointment of Commissioners to agree upon terms of capitulation of the forces and fort under my command, and in that view suggest an armistice until 12 o'clock to-day. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your ob't se'v't, SB BUCKNER, Brig. Gen. CSA To Brigadier-General US GRANT, Com'ding US Forces, Near Fort Donelson.
Page 523 - For mankind are one in spirit, and an instinct bears along, round the earth's electric circle, the swift flash of right or wrong; whether conscious or unconscious, yet humanity's vast frame through its ocean-sundered fibers feels the gush of joy or shame; — in the gain or loss of one race all the rest have equal claim.
Page 292 - What were our lives without thee? What all our lives to save thee ? We reck not what we gave thee ; We will not dare to doubt thee. But ask whatever else, and we will dare ! (LOWELL : Harvard Commemoration Ode, strophe xii.
Page 291 - She that lifts up the manhood of the poor, She of the open soul and open door, With room about her hearth for all mankind!
Page 156 - By direction of the President of the United States I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac. As a soldier, in obeying this order, an order totally unexpected and unsolicited, I have no promises or pledges to make. The country looks to this army to relieve it from the devastation and disgrace of a hostile invasion. Whatever fatigues and sacrifices we may be called upon to undergo, let us have in view constantly the magnitude of the interests involved, and let each man determine to do his...
Page 157 - ... invasion. Whatever fatigues and sacrifices we may be called upon to undergo, let us have in view constantly the magnitude of the interests involved, and let each man determine to do his duty, leaving to an all-controlling Providence the decision of the contest. It is with just diffidence that I relieve in the command of this army an eminent and accomplished soldier, whose name must ever appear conspicuous in the history of its achievements ; but I rely upon the hearty support of my companions...
Page 515 - ... grey fathers know nothing to seek for but the corpses of their blooming sons, and girls forget all vanity to make lint and bandages which may serve for the shattered limbs of their betrothed husbands.

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