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the last twenty lines of which are little less than a translation of that part of Mr. Drouyn de l'Huys's despatch.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

WM. L. DAYTON.

Secretary of State, &c.

Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward.

PARIS, September 18, 1863.

No. 348]

SIR: Another note, just received from our consular representative at Brest, informs me that the repairs of the Florida are advancing very rapidly, and that she will not require more than fifteen days more to complete them.

Seventy-five of her crew, however, have been shipped to England, and landed at Cardiff. Captain Maffitt, whose health is bad and is much worn, it is said, is to come to Paris to-day, to take some repose from his labors.

The seizure of the Florida to answer damages to French citizens, so much spoken of in the journals, will not, I fear, operate to detain her.

I am,

sir, your obedient servant,

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, &c.

WM. L. DAYTON.

Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward.

No. 349.]

PARIS, September 18, 1863.

SIR: I have this morning called the attention of Mr. Drouyn de l'Huys to the evidence showing that at least four, if not five, ships are being built in the ship-yards of Bordeaux and Nantes for the confederates. This evidence is the same as that sent to you from the Paris consulate, and which I referred to in my despatch No. 344. It is conclusive, I think, as to the facts charged. Mr. Drouyn de l'Huys expressed himself as greatly surprised, and I doubt not he was so. He assured me he had no knowledge of anything of the kind, and that the government would maintain its neutrality. He thanked me for calling his attention promptly to this matter, the importance of which he fully recognized. He requested copies of the original papers; said that he would at once investigate the facts and the French legislation bearing on the question, and then let me know what would be done.

It seems to me that their action on this subject is likely to afford a pretty good test of their future intentions. As to what the law may be it does not, I apprehend, much matter: if they mean that good relations with our country shall be preserved, they will stop the building of these ships, or at least the arming and delivery of them; if they mean to break with us, they will let them go on.

The United States ship Kearsarge, Captain Winslow, arrived in the port of Brest yesterday.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

WM. L. DAYTON.

Secretary of State, &c.

No. 399.]

Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, September 19, 1863.

SIR: Your despatch of the 3d of September, No. 341, has been received. Reserving, for the present, remarks upon the political aspect of the reception. of the Florida at Brest, I have submitted the despatch to the Secretary of the Navy, and asked his consideration of your suggestion, in regard to sending a force to intercept the Florida on her leaving that harbor.

I will make the Secretary's decision known to you as soon as it shall have been received from him.

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SIR: The French forces are understood to hold in subjection to the new provisional government established in Mexico three of the States, while all the other constituent members of the public of Mexico still remain under its authority. There are already indications of designs, in those States, to seek aid in the United States, with the consent of this government, if attainable, and without it if it shall be refused; and for this purpose inducements are held out, well calculated to excite sympathies in a border population. The United States government has hitherto practiced strict neutrality between the French and Mexico, and all the more cheerfully, because it has relied on the assurances given by the French government that it did not intend permanent occupation of that country or any violence to the sovereignty of its people. The proceedings of the French in Mexico are regarded by many in that country, and in this, as at variance with those assurances. Owing to this circumstance, it becomes very difficult for this government to enforce a rigid observance of its neutrality laws. The President thinks it desirable that you should seek an opportunity to mention these facts to Mr. Drouyn de l'Huys, and to suggest to him that the interests of the United States, and, as it seems to us, the interests of France herself, require that a solution of the present complications in Mexico be made, as early as may be convenient, upon the basis of the unity and independence of Mexico. I cannot be misinterpreting the sentiments of the United States in saying that they do not desire an annexation of Mexico, or any part of it; nor do they desire any special interest, control, or influence there, but they are deeply interested in the re-establishment of unity, peace, and order in the neighboring republic, and exceedingly desirous that there may not arise out of the war in Mexico any cause of alienation between them and France. Insomuch as these sentiments are by no means ungenerous, the President unhesitatingly believes that they are the sentiments of the Emperor himself in regard to Mexico.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM L. DAYTON, Esq., &c., &c., &c.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

No. 401.]

Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, September 22, 1863.

SIR: I enclose, for your information, a translation of a note of the 20th of July last, which has been addressed to me by Mr. J. M. Arroyo, who calls himself under secretary of state and foreign affairs of the Mexican empire, setting forth recent proceedings, with a view to the organization of the new government at Mexico; also a copy of a memorandum which has been left with me by a person calling himself General Cortes, alleged to have been formerly governor of the Mexican State of Sonora. No reply has been, or probably will be, made to either of these papers.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WM. L. DAYTON, Esq.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

Mr. Arroyo to Mr. Seward.

[Translation.]

PALACE OF THE REGENCY OF THE EMPIRE OF MEXICO,

July 20, 1863.

The undersigned, under secretary of state and of foreign affairs of the Mexican empire, has the honor to address the present communication to his excellency the Secretary of State and of Foreign Affairs of the United States of America, to the end that he may be pleased to place within the knowledge of his government the recent important events which have finally resulted in the organization of an appropriate, strong, and durable government, with a view that the nation might be constituted.

This capital having been occupied on the 10th ultimo by the allied Franco-Mexican army, the first care of the general-in-chief was to issue a decree convening a superior gubernative junto of thirty-five members, composed of the most distinguished notabilities; and, moreover, another of two hundred and fifteen notables, in order that, united to the former, they might form an assembly of two hundred and fifty persons selected from all classes of society, and from all the departments, which, in conformity to public law and to the traditional usages of the country, should express the wish of the nation as to the form of government that would best suit it.

The gubernative junto having met, decreed the establishment of a provisional executive power composed of three members, appointing the most excellent the generals of division, Don Juan N. Almonte and Don Mariano Salas, and the most illustrious the archbishop of Mexico, Don Pelagio Antonio de Labastida, at present absent in Europe, and to act as his substitute the most illustrious Don Juan B. Ormaechea, bishop elect of Tulancingo, who, in such character, immediately took up the reins of government.

The assembly of the notables having convened in conformity to the decree of the thirteenth of June last, was engaged in causing to be made the important declaration in regard to the form of government, with a view to its permanent stability and the future happiness of the nation. The final result of their labors has been the solemn decree, a copy of which the undersigned has the satisfaction to enclose to his excellency, in which appears the following declaration:

1st. The Mexican nation adopts, as its form of government, a limited hereditary monarchy, with a Catholic prince.

2d. The sovereign shall take the title of Emperor of Mexico.

3d. The imperial crown of Mexico is offered to his imperial and royal highness the Prince Ferdinand Maximilian, Archduke of Austria, for himself and his descendants.

4th. If, under circumstances which cannot be foreseen, the Archduke of Austria, Ferdinand Maximilian, should not take possession of the throne which is offered to him, the Mexican nation relies on the good will of his Majesty Napoleon III, Emperor of the French, to indicate for it another Catholic prince.

This solemn and explicit declaration was received by all classes of society with gratification, and even with enthusiasm, manifested in such a way that the undersigned does not fear to anticipate its complete realization; and so much the more so, since he receives every day numerous manifestations of accession, notice of which his excellency will see in the official journal of the empire, which is annexed.

Consequently the undersigned relies on the moral co-operation of the governments which are friendly to Mexico, among which he has the satisfaction of enumerating that of the United States of America, which has given so many proofs of its interest in the happiness of Mexico.

The undersigned avails himself of this opportunity to offer to his excellency the Secretary of State of the United States of America the assurances of his distinguished consideration. J. M. ARROYO.

His Excellency the SECRETARY Of State and FOREIGN AFFAIRS

of the United States of America.

Mr. Arroyo to Mr. Seward.

(Translation.)

SECRETARYSHIP OF STATE AND OF THE Office of FOREIGN RELATIONS.

PALACE OF THE SUPREME EXECUTIVE POWER,

Mexico, July 11, 1863.

The provisional supreme executive power has been pleased to address me the following decree:

"The provisional supreme executive power of the nation to the inhabitants thereof: Know ye, that the Assembly of Notables has thought fit to decree as follows:

The Assembly of Notables, in virtue of the decree of the 16th ultimo, that it should make known the form of government which best suited the nation, in use of the full right which the nation has to constitute itself, and as its organ and interpreter, declares, with absolute liberty and independence, as follows:

"1. The Mexican nation adopts as its form of government a limited hereditary monarchy, with a Catholic prince.

2. The sovereign shall take the title of Emperor of Mexico,

"3. The imperial crown of Mexico is offered to his imperial and royal highness the Prince Ferdinand Maximilian, Archduke of Austria, for himself and his descendants.

***If, under circumstances which cannot be foreseen, the Archduke of Austria, Ferdinand Maximilian, should not take possession of the throne which is offered to him, the Mexican nation relies on the good will of his Majesty Napoleon III, Emperor of the French, to indicate for it another Catholic prince.

"Given in the Hall of Sessions of the Assembly, on the 10th of July, 1863. "TEODOSIO LARES, President.

"ALEJANDRO ARANGO Y ESCANDON, Secretary. ***JOSÉ MARIA ANDRADE, Secretary.'

"Therefore, let it be printed, published by national edict, and circulated, and let due fulfilment be given thereto.

“Given at the palace of the supreme executive power in Mexico, on the 11th of July, 1863

"JUAN N. ALMONTE.
"JOSE MARIANO SALAS.
"JUAN B. ORMAECHEA.

"To the UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE and of the OFFICE OF FOREIGN RELATIONS." And I communicate it to you for your knowledge and consequent purposes.

J. M. ARROYO,

Under Secretary of State, and of the Office of Foreign Relations.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

Mr. Arroyo to Mr. Seward.
(Translation.)

SECRETARYSHIP OF STATE AND OF THE OFFICE OF FOREIGN RELATIONS.

PALACE OF THE SUPREME EXECUTIVE POWER,

Mexico, July 11, 1863.

The provisional supreme executive power has been pleased to address me the following decree:

"The provisional supreme executive power of the nation to the inhabitants thereof: Know ye, that the Assembly of Notables has thought fit to decree as follows:

The Assembly [of Notables, in view of the decree of this date, has thought fit to decree:

666

"Until the arrival of the sovereign the persons appointed, by decree of 22d of June last, to form the provisional government, shall exercise the power in the very terms established by the decree referred to, with the character of the regency of the Mexican empire. 'Given in the Hall of Sessions of the Assembly on the 11th of July, 1863. "TEODOSIO LARES, President.

666

666

ALEJANDRO ARANGO Y ESCANDON, Secretary. "JOSÉ MARIA ANDRADE, Secretary.'

"Therefore, let it be printed, published, and circulated, and let due fulfilment be given thereto.

"Given at the palace of the supreme executive power in Mexico, on the 11th of July, 1863.

66 JUAN N. ALMONTE.
"JOSÉ MARIANO DE SALAS.
"JUAN B. ORMAECHEA.

"To the UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE and of thE OFFICE OF FOREIN RELATIONS. "DON J. MIGUEL ARROYO."

And I communicate it to you for your knowledge and consequent purposes.

J. M. ARROYO,

Under Secretary of State, and of the Office of Foreign Relations.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

No. 404.]

Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, September 23, 1863. SIR: Recurring to your No. 341, of the 3d instant, and to my No. 399, I have now to inform you that no attempt at a blockade of the port of Brest will be made by our navy to prevent the departure of the piratical.vessel, Florida. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

Hon. WILLIAM L. DAYTON, Esq.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

No. 350.]

Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward.

PARIS, September 24, 1863.

SIR: Herewith I have the honor to enclose to your department the copy of a communication made by me to Mr. Drouyn de l'Huys on the 22d instant, in reference to the ships now being built and the arms, projectiles, &c., now being made at Bordeaux and Nantes for the rebels of the south. The evidence has been heretofore sent to your department.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

:

Secretary of State, &c., &c., &c.

WILLIAM L. DAYTON.

Mr. Dayton to Mr. Druyn de l'Huys.

PARIS, September 22, 1863.

MONSIEUR In conformity with the request of your excellency, I herewith. have the honor to enclose to you copies, furnished to me, of the original correspondence, a translation of which I read to you on Friday last.

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