The Third Reader for Primary Schools

Front Cover
Taintor bros., Merrill & Company, 1878
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 148 - THE boy stood on the burning deck, Whence all but him had fled; The flame that lit the battle's wreck Shone round him o'er the dead. Yet beautiful and bright he stood, As born to rule the storm; A creature of heroic blood, A proud though childlike form. The flames rolled on; he would not go Without his father's word; That father, faint in death below, His voice no longer heard. He called aloud...
Page 149 - Speak, Father!" once again he cried, "If I may yet be gone!" —And but the booming shots replied, And fast the flames rolled on.
Page 140 - Full of a nature Nothing can tame. Changed every moment, Ever the same ; Ceaseless aspiring, Ceaseless content, Darkness or sunshine, Thy element.
Page 149 - And shouted but once more aloud, "My father! must I stay?" While o'er him fast, through sail and shroud, The wreathing fires made way. They...
Page 97 - Do you ask what the birds say ? The Sparrow, the Dove, The Linnet and Thrush say, ' ' I love and I love ! " In the winter they're silent — the wind is so strong ; What it says, I don't know, but it sings a loud song. But green leaves, and blossoms, and sunny warm weather, And singing, and loving — all come back together. But the Lark is so brimful of gladness and love, The green fields below him, the blue sky above, That he sings, and he sings ; and for ever sings he" I love my Love, and my Love...
Page 20 - What does little birdie say In her nest at peep of day ? Let me fly, says little birdie, Mother, let me fly away. Birdie, rest a little longer, Till the little wings are stronger. So she rests a little longer, Then she flies away. What does little baby say, In her bed at peep of day ? Baby says, like little birdie, Let me rise and fly away.
Page 149 - Upon his brow he felt their breath, And in his waving hair, And looked from that lone post of death In still, yet brave despair. And shouted but once more aloud, "My father! must I stay?
Page 96 - One step, and then another, And the longest walk is ended ; One stitch, and then another, And the largest rent is mended ; One brick upon another, And the highest wall is made ; One flake upon another, And the deepest snow is laid.
Page 82 - You cannot see me coming, Nor hear my low sweet humming; For in the starry night, And the glad morning light, I come quietly creeping everywhere. Here I come creeping, creeping everywhere; More welcome than the flowers In summer's pleasant hours ; The gentle cow is glad, And the merry bird not sad, To see me creeping, creeping everywhere.
Page 150 - They wrapt the ship in splendor wild, They caught the flag on high, And streamed above the gallant child, Like banners in the sky. There came a burst of thunder sound — The boy — oh ! where was he ? Ask of the winds that far around With fragments strewed the sea. With mast, and helm, and pennon fair, That well had borne their part — But the noblest thing that perished there, Was that young faithful heart.

Bibliographic information