George Washington Day by Day

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Elizabeth Bryant Johnston
Cycle Publishing Company, 1895 - United States - 207 pages
Brief extracts from Washington's writings and other sources and accounts of events in his life, arranged in the form of a calendar.
 

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Page 179 - Filling a glass, he turned to them and said, "with a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy, as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 186 - You can form no idea of the perplexity of my situation. No man, I believe, ever had a greater choice of difficulties, and less means to extricate himself from them. However, under a full persuasion .of the justice of our cause, I cannot entertain an idea, that it will finally sink, though it may remain for some time under a cloud.
Page 86 - The prevalence of that pacific and friendly disposition among the people of the United States, which will induce them to forget their local prejudices and policies ; to make those mutual concessions, which are requisite to the general prosperity ; and, in some instances, to sacrifice their individual advantages to the interest of the community.
Page 49 - For myself, the delay may be compared to a reprieve; for in confidence, I tell you (with the world it would obtain little credit,) that my movements to the chair of government will be accompanied by feelings not unlike those of a culprit who is going to the place of his execution...
Page xiii - Once, ah, once, within these walls, One whom memory oft recalls, The Father of his Country, dwelt. And yonder meadows broad and damp The fires of the besieging camp Encircled with a burning belt.
Page 89 - As to pay, sir, I beg leave to assure the Congress that as no pecuniary consideration could have tempted me to have accepted this arduous employment at the expense of my domestic ease and happiness, I do not wish to make any profit from it: I will keep an exact account of my expenses; those I doubt not they will discharge, and that is all I desire...
Page 133 - I never mean, unless some particular circumstances should compel me to it, to possess another slave by purchase, it being among my first wishes to see some plan adopted by which slavery, in this country, may be abolished by law.
Page 120 - Honored Madam: If it is in my power to avoid going to the Ohio again, I shall; but if the command is pressed upon me by the general voice of the country, and offered upon such terms as cannot be objected against, it would reflect dishonor on me to refuse it...
Page 114 - The general is sorry to be informed, that the foolish and wicked practice of profane cursing and swearing, a vice heretofore little known in an American army, is growing into fashion. He hopes the officers will, by example as well as influence...
Page 162 - With these wishes and this benediction, the Commander-inchief is about to retire from service. The curtain of separation will soon be drawn, and the military scene to him will be closed for ever.

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