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those monstrous mortars they had to take shelter behind
the timber work that enclosed them, so heavy was the con-
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POPE'S VICTORY AT NEW MADRID.

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In the mean time General Pope, in command of a division
in Missouri had moved down from Commerce, by order of Gen-
eral Halleck, to Point Pleasant near New Madrid, a few miles
below the island, where he found a large force of the enemy
intrenched. Not having any heavy guns, he sent to St. Louis
for them. These he transported over roads almost impas-
sable, and working with an energy and resolution that mocked
at difficulties, at length got them mounted, when he opened
on the enemy. Finding the fire becoming too hot, they de-
camped in the night in such haste, that they left all the bag.
gage of the officers and knapsacks of the men behind, and
their dead unburied, and took refuge on the Kentucky shore.
Our loss was about fifty killed and wounded Pope then
planted his batteries on the shore, shutting the rebel fleet
up between him and the island, and cutting off communica-
tion from below by water. Beyond this, however, he was
powerless to do any thing to aid Foote.

Without a single
transport or gun boat, and no way of obtaining them, he was
confined to the task of simply holding his position.
a terrible trial to an energetic, active commander like him, to
sit idly there on the banks of the river, listening day after
day and week after week, to the heavy cannonading above
him, and think how easily with a few boats he could cross
over to the Kentucky shore and end this long struggle.

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19

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CHAPTER XXIV.

MARCH,

1862

CAPTURE OF NEWBERN BY BURNSIDE--THE MARCH-THE ATTACK-THE VIC? TORY--ACTION OF THE FLEET-FEELING OF THE PEOPLE-BURNSIDE'S DIS

PATCHTHE PRESIDENT ASSUMES ACTIVE COMMAND OF THE ARMY AND OR

DERS A GENERAL ADVANCE-AN IMPORTANT EPOCH IN THE HISTORY OF THE

WAR-FREMONT IN COMMAND OF THE MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENTSMANASSAS

EVACUATED

CHAGRIN OF THE PEOPLE- JACKSON BEYOND THE BLUE RIDGE

PC RSUED BY BANKS-TRAP SET FOR HIM BY SHIELDS-BATTLE OF WINCHES

TER-POUND GAP IN EAST TENNESSEE TAKEN BY GARFIELD-THE NASHVILLE ESCAPES FROM BEAUFORT-THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE CONCERNING EMANCI

PATION IN THE STATES.

W

HILE the daily reports from Island Number Ten.were

sults, news from Burnside's expedition electrified the nation. Rumors were current that this gallant officer was moving on Norfolk, and great fears were entertained by many that the rebel

army in front of McClellan, would suddenly fall below Richmond, and crush him before he could receive reinforcements, or reach the protection of his gun boats. But the nncertainty that had prevailed respecting his movements, was suddenly dispelled by the news that he had captured the city of Newbern,

CAPTURE OF NEWBERN, NORTH CAROLINA.

A combined attack on the place, by land and water, having been resolved upon, the expedition, with the gun boats in advance, followed by the vast concourse of transports, set sail from Roanoke Island, on the twelfth, and slowly moved in the direction of Newbern. Reaching the mouth of the Neuse on which the city is situated, the fleet ascended the

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river some twenty miles, and came to anchor, to wait for daylight. The night was clear and balmy as summer, and as the bright moon sailed up among the stars, flooding the stream with ight, and throwing the woods on the adjacent banks into deeper shadow, it looked down on a scene of tranquil beauty that gave no indications of the carnage and death soon to follow. The troops, inspired by it, sent their songs over the quiet waters, while far inland the bright fires of the enemy checkered the landscape. But as night wore on, every sound died away, and the soldiers lay down to their rest. Before morning it began to rain, and the thirteenth dawned gloomily on the expedition. But the clouds soon broke away, and the warm, bright sun came out, and was hailed as a cheering omen. About seven o'clock, the small boats were lowered and filled with troops, and it was soon cvident that the land forces were going no farther by water towards Newbern. The spot selected for the landing wis near the mouth of Slocum's creek, about twelve miles from the city by water, but four or five miles farther by land. The regiments formed on the beach, and after marching a little over two miles through the sand, came to an encampment. At sight of it the men dashed forward with a cheer, but they found it deserted. The rebels had fled in such haste, that they left blankets and camp equipage behind, while the warm breakfast lay untouched, and the fires that cooked it were still burning. A brief nalt only wcs made here, and the column again took up its line of march, while over the forest, like heavy thunder, came the steady explosions of cannon from the gun boats, as they moved up the stream, shelling the woods in advance of the army. The promise of a bright day which the morning wore, now suddenly vanished, and heavy, leaden clouds closed rapidly over the sun, flinging a deep shadow on the earth. Soon the rain began to descend a torrents. All day long it poured, drenching the coldiers

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to their skins--yet they marched steadily on through it and the deep mud. About noon, skirmishers, who had been sent out, returned with the report that a short distance ahead there was a formidable earthwork, erected directly across their route. A halt was ordered, and a reconnoitering party sent forward, which soon returned and reported the works abandoned. The march was then resumed, and the troops passing through them, came to the rail road leading to the city. Where the highway crossed the track there were some meadows, in which the troops stacked their arms and snatched a hasty meal from their haversacks, and drank from the water by the roadside. Here the army divided into two columns, one keeping along the rail road track, and the other the stage road.

After marching for two hours, the rail road and highway again crossed each other, and the two columns once more came together. Here, in some meadows, a halt was ordered, and the troops breaking line, laid aside their knapsacks, and throwing themselves on the ground, or sitting down on logs and fallen trees, rested their weary limbs. But soon the drum called them to their ranks again, and though foot-sore and wet, they marched cheerfully forward. Night came on, yet they still moved carefully along in the darkness till eight o'clock, when they encamped. Some few found shelter in the scattered farm houses and barns, but the main army

rested on the soaked fields. The long night passed quietly, and at daylight the troops stood to their arms again. About seven o'clock, sharp firing ahead told that the skirmishers had encountered the enemy. In a few minutes the regiments were in their places, and moved forward. Burnside rode on with his staff to examine the ground, and as he came to a wide field, a bat:ery on the farther side opened, and a shell struck without explouing, within ten feet of him. The rail road, bighway, and river Neusa, at this point run nearly parallel

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to each other, and not far apart. The river bank was lined for a long distance towards Newbern with batteries, which commanded both the river itself, and the road inland leading to the city. From the first of these, a line of rifle pits, half a mile in length, extended across the roads, ending in a swamp. Burnside immediately ordered Foster to advance along the road against the enemy's left, Parke to follow him up till opposite the enemy's center, while Reno was to keep along the rail road and attack his right. The artillery was then advanced, and the battle opened. At the first gun, the rebel infantry stretched out in line, from the battery on the banks of the river to the rail road. At this point commenced a series of redoubts and rille piis, extending nearly tlıree miles. But of these the flanking brigade was entirely ignorant, as it floundered through the swamp to get in. rear of the first works. The regiments in every part of the field moved steadily into their places amid a storm of shot, and soon the wounded were borne rapidly back through the lines. The enemy were concealed behind their works, so that nothing but their heads were visible, while our troops stood usposed to their long line of fire. It was hopeless to sustain any length of time, such an unequal contest, and the order to charge was given. A shout went up from the whole line at the order, and the intrepid regiments moved straight on the enemy's works. Four companies of the Massachusetts Twentyfirst were first inside, but were almost immediately driven out again by the overwhelming numbers of the enemy. Reinforced by the New York Fifty-first and New Jersey and Rhode Island troops, they again turned to the assault, when the whole mounted the ramparts together, with a shout that rose over the roar of the guns. Hand to hand, and breast to breast, they fought their desperate way, till the enemy broke and fled in dismay. When the brigade on the right heard the charging cheer of those on the left, they dashed from the

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