Our Brother in Black: His Freedom and His Future

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Phillips & Hunt, 1881 - African Americans - 252 pages
Haygood's Our Brothers in Black is a work that concentrates on how best to prepare the freed slaves for full participation in the American community. Noting African American community life, their relationship to the land and to their religion, he advocates education, missionary work and the establishment of black colleges. The book begins by discussing blacks' educational and economic shortcomings but discredits the popular idea that they should be returned to Africa. Haygood gives a detailed study of Lincoln and the motives for the emancipation but is focused on solving the present problem rather than condemning its existence.

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A re-print of the author's 1889 revision of the 1881 original. The author engages in a social analysis of the plight of African-Americans of 1881, not long after emancipation and before the prevalence ... Read full review

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Page 42 - Truly the light is sweet, and a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to behold the sun...
Page 66 - That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any state or designated part of a state, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever, free...
Page 193 - And I will come near to you to judgment; And I will be a swift witness Against the sorcerers, and against the adulterers, and against false swearers, And against those that oppress the hireling in his wages, The widow, and the fatherless, And that turn aside the stranger from his right, and fear not me, Saith the Lord of hosts.
Page 59 - If there be in it any inferences which I may believe to be falsely drawn, I do not, now and here, argue against them. If there be perceptible in it an impatient and dictatorial tone, I waive it in deference to an old friend, whose heart I have always supposed to be right. As to the policy I "seem to be pursuing," as you say, I have not meant to leave any one in doubt.
Page 193 - At his day thou shalt give him his hire, neither shall the sun go down upon it; for he is poor, and setteth his heart upon it: lest he cry against thee unto the LORD, and it be sin unto thee.
Page 194 - Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth : and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth.
Page 194 - Servants, be obedient to them that are your masters according to the flesh, with fear and trembling, in singleness of your heart, as unto Christ...
Page 26 - But as for you, ye thought evil against me; but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass, as it is this day, to save much people alive.
Page 132 - And he learns well and rapidly. I want no proof beyond what I have seen with my own eyes, and heard with my own ears.
Page 49 - All this came upon the king Nebuchadnezzar. At the end of twelve months he walked in the palace of the kingdom of Babylon. The king spake, and said, Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of the kingdom by the might of my power, and for the honour of my majesty...

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