The Lost Art of the Great Speech: How to Write It, how to Deliver it

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AMACOM, 2000 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
"Splashy slides, confident body language, and a lot of eye contact are fine and well. But if a speech is rambling, illogical, or just plain boring, the impact will be lost. Now everyone can learn to give powerful, on-target speeches that capture an audience's attention and drive home a message. The key is not just in the delivery techniques, but in tapping into the power of language. Prepared by an award-winning writer, this authoritative speech-writing guide covers every essential element of a great speech, including outlining and organizing, beginning with a bang, making use of action verbs and vivid nouns, and handling questions from the audience. Plus, the book includes excerpts from some of history's most memorable speeches--eloquent words to contemplate and emulate."
 

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A good book for everybody who is interested in giving or drafting good speeches or presentations.
On the positive side:
Most of the ideas about audience, structuring and purpose can be applied beyond way beyond speeches.
The best are the 1 or 2 speeches at the end of each chapter which demonstrate how powerful a well written speech can be - and how beautiful to read.
There are two downsides.
The advices on how to deliver a speech are rather basic. The weakest point of the book are the out of dates advices on where to find information. The author definitely hasn't made it into the age of Internet.
This aside; it is a good and insightful book.
 

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I thought this was a great read.. It is a real asset to anyone who is learning how to become a public speaker, or someone who just needs confidence in being able to speak infront of a crowd. I must say that this book to a large extent has also helped me in developing and encouring me to express myself in written word. The Mr. Dowis's approach to writing this book is of great interest as he has written the book as a conversation between himself and the reader.. you read the book as if he was infront of you, speaking with you.. which is great. You look forward to "listening to what he has to say next". Again, this is a great read for someone wanting to improving there public speaking ability! 

Contents

II
1
III
9
IV
10
V
12
VI
22
VII
27
VIII
31
IX
42
XXII
131
XXIII
142
XXIV
154
XXV
158
XXVI
171
XXVII
173
XXVIII
180
XXIX
186

X
44
XI
46
XII
55
XIII
58
XIV
69
XV
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XVI
85
XVII
88
XVIII
98
XIX
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XX
112
XXI
116
XXX
192
XXXI
196
XXXII
209
XXXIII
210
XXXIV
221
XXXV
225
XXXVI
237
XXXVII
239
XXXVIII
253
XXXIX
255
XL
261
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About the author (2000)

Richard Dowis (Waleska, GA) recently retired from his position as senior vice president at the PR firm of Manning, Selvage & Lee. He now leads several popular business-writing seminars and is the president of the Society for the Preservation of English Language and Literature. He has also won PRSA Phoenix Awards for speech and annual report writing. His books include How to Make Your Writing Reader-Friendly and (as coauthor) The Write Way.

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