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THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

434713

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATION8.

1908

INDEX OF VOL. IV.-NEW SERIES. 1861.

PORTRAIT OF Rev. Dr. VAN RENSSALAER.

SERYOX

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1.- Ministries of Time,

By Rev. A. L. Stone, D.D.,
II.—The Retributive Power of Memory, By Rey. Samuel T. Spear, D.D.,
III.—The Duty of Praising God,

Rev. Cortlandt Van Rensselaer, D.D.,
IV.-Lessons from the Life and End of Judas Iscariot,

By Rev. Wm. S. Plumer, D.D., LL.D.,
V.-The Reign of the Saints,

By Rev. Walter Clarke, D.D.,
VI.—The Deceitful Hope,
VII.—The Anointing at Bethany, By Rev. Charles N. Baird,
VIII.—The Divine Incarnation,

By Rev. Samuel T. Spear, D.D.,
IX.—The Great Work-Day of Life,
X.—The Loneliness of Guilt,

By Rev. Henry M. Field,
XI. —Abram, the Man of Peace, By Rev. Rufus W. Bailey, D.D.,
XII.—The Return of Spring,

By Rev. Elias Nason,
XIII – The Last Enemy Destroyed, By Rev. G. N. Webber,
XIV.—The Kingdom of Christ,

By Rev. Edward D. Griffin, D.D.,
XV.-Christian Assurance,
XVI.—The War, and the Patriot's Duty By Rev. A. L. Stone,
XVII.-The National Crisis,

By Rev. E. E. Seelye, D.D.,
XVIII.—
The Nation's Crisis and the Christian's Duty,

By Rev. Robert R. Booth,
XX.—The Good Never Die,

By Rev. John Todd, D.D.,
XX.-Longing for Sunset,

By Rev. W. H. Corning,
The Codex Sinaiticus,
XXI.—The Gentleness and Energy of Christianity,

By Rev. Henry A. Nelson, D.D.,
XII.—The Providence of God, By Rev. Lewis Sabin, D.D.,
XXIII.—The Sufferings of Christ,
XXIV.-The Nature of Religious Sorrow,
XXV.-The True Estimate of Men, By Rev. S. D. Phelps, D.D.,

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XXVI.—Confounding Right and Wrong, By Rev. S. G. Buckingham,

269 XXVII.— The Believer's Joyful Love to an Unseen Saviour,

By Rev. N. C. Locke, D.D.,

278 XXVIII.-In Memoriam of Rev. Joab Brace, D.D.,

By Rev. John Todd, D.D.,

287 XXIX.—Christ Wounded in the House of His Friends,

By Rev. E. H. Gillett,

304 XXX.—The Power of Prejudice,

309 XXXI.–Our National Sin,

By Rev. Roswell D. Hitchcock, D.D., 319 XXXII.—North and South,

By Rev. J. Ilawes, D.D.,

330 XXXIII.—Repentance for National Sins, By Rev. William Adams, D.D., 348 XXXIV.—The “Things which are not:” God's Chosen Instruments for Advancing His Kingdom,

By Richard S. Storrs, Jr., D.D., 351

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BY REV. A. L. STONE, D.D.,

PASTOR OF THE PARK-STREET CHURCH, BOSTON.

THE MINISTRIES OF TIME.

"I the Lord will hasten it in his time."-ISAIAH 60: 22. God is Sovereign and Omnipotent, but he waits the ministration of Time. He could force seasons and laws, but it is his way rather to work through them and by them. He has ordained them as servitors of his will. His purposes on the earth, in the conduct of human affairs, had, in respect to their accomplishment, a germination, a process, and a harvest-hour of consummation.

Time is the prime-minister of Providence, and brings to pass in due order, at their full periods, and at the appointed juncture, the patient counsels of the Most High. There is no hurrying and no sickness of deferred hope on that eternal and tranquil mind. “One day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.” It lends a new dignity and a sterner and loftier majesty to Time, when we consider it thus, not impersonally, as the passing away of our days—the swift, mute lapse of the stream of life sliding down the vale—but as a strong executive angel, a sceptered and conscious force that has it in charge to reveal and fulfill the hidden plan of God.

Man is strong and works great changes upon the earth and his fellow-man. Art is strong and produces its rapid marvels. The forces serving the human will are nimble and muscular. Heat and frost lift up monuments of their might and magic. The fires of earth's center, the winds that sweep over her surface, the seas that thunder along her shores, these have their power and their trophies. But Time is the great magician. All these latter forces are sinews of its own arm. The changes, the revolutions, the histories of this world are only chronicles of the vice-regency of Time,

It is fitting, as the swift shuttle glances past again, drawing another thread into the woven fabric of God's scheme for earth and man, bringing out yet more clearly the parts in the pattern for the whole, that we pause to consider

This ministry of time in accomplishing the Divine pleasure.

If the whole scope of the supreme administration may not be known thus, we may gather at least some of the principles and particulars that unite at last to perfect that consummate whole. We shall see that Time is among men, the revealer, the attester, the vindicator, the rectifier, the fulfiller.

Time tests the principles of human conduct. I speak here of avowed principles, consciously, perhaps boldly proceeded upon, set in contrast or antagonism with one another. There is a differ ference among men, both in theory and in practice, in respect to these principles. The diversity and the divergence illustrate themselves in innumerable ways. Look in upon two scenes of family training. In one of them the idea is, with the controlling head, that the true end of domestic nurture is social success. Special stress then will be laid upon the accomplishments, whose chief grace is external.

The manner is a matter of first concern. The gloss of an outward polish is of great price. The step must be put under tuition. Motion must be artistic-graduated to rule and canon. Exits and entrances must be fashioned after a model. The introduction into society is a grand and solemn crisis. Ac. quaintances must be made. The young lives must be launched upon the social world. What if they should be neglected, thrown out of the current, stranded high and dry upon the bank—the stream of their generation flowing merrily by, and leaving them, as it were, only to serve as landmarks for the progress of the gay, iris-tinted bubbles that float, with music and laughter, ever on amid greenness and bloom? This must not be. A social triumph must in some way be achieved. And all the care and painstaking converge to this issue. In the other the commanding object is the

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