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FOR THE USE OF ACADEMIES AND THE HIGHER CLASSES IN

COMMON AND SELECT SCHOOLS.

BY

CHARLES W. SANDERS,

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AUTHOR OF SFELLINS BOOK, AND SERIES OF 8C#COL READERI.

TWELFTH EDITION

NEW YORK:
MARK H. NEWMAN.
SCHOOL BOOK PUBLISHER,

199 Broadway.

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Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1842,

BY CHARLES W. SANDERS, in the Clerk's Office of ihe District Court of the United States for the

Southern District of New York.

STEREOTYPED BY
SMITH AND WRIGHT,
FULTON STREET, CORNER JOLD.

NEW YORK

PREFACE.

In the previous numbers of the School Readers, the general design was to furnish, in addition to other important characteristics, those facilities whereby the scholar might acquire an easy and fluent manner of reading-aiming to preveni the acquisition of those pernicious habits, so commonly contracted in the perusal of first lessons. It was, therefore, thought proper to reserve an exposition of the elementary principles of reailing for the present work, lelieving that an earlier introduction of them, would be attended with injury rather than benefit. Accordingly, Part First of the present work, is devoted to that subject, and Part Second, being mainly conformed to the general plan presented in former numbers, aside from such peculiarities as the design of the work seemed to demand, contains suct. lessons for exercise in readiny, as are illustrative of the principles set forth in the former.

The principal features which characterize that portion devoted to the rhetorical principles, will be found to consist in iis brevity and general arrangement, and, at the same time, to embrace nearly, or quite all, the important topics introduced in vtner works, especially appropriated to this subject. In order that these lessons may be rendered of practical utility, and the principles which they are designed to set forth, as pirspicuous as possible, they are accompanied with such examples as are calculated not only to illustrate the subject, but also to afford appropriate lessons for exercise in realling. Each lesson is followed by a series of such questions as are adapted to elicit a knowledge of the several topics which it embraces.

As to the importance of a concise and appropriate exposition of the elementary principles of reading in a work of this kind, a doubt will not be entertained, and it is believed that its utility will be generally, if not universally, appreciated. For a want of it, teachers are often compelled to make use of works so voluminous in their character, as tend to excite a distaste in the mind of the scholar for a study, which, otherwise, might be rendered pleasing an I beneficial.

It is often the case that scholars become familiar with the principles of in Blection, emphasis, and the like, in theory, but derive froin it little or no practical benefit. This is in consequence of not applying such knowledge when perusing their reading lessons. For this reason, the author has been induced to add, to the ordinary questions in relation to the subject, such general questions in regard to certain rhetorical and grammatical principles, as each lesson is designed to illustrate, and thereby bringing into practical exercise, a knowledge of the principles presented in the former part. In instances where it is thought a doubt might exist as to what rule or remark allusion is madle, the reference is noted in connection with the question. Thus, by frequent reference to the several topics treated upon in the elementary part, a practical and thorougla knowledge of them will be acquired.

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