Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England, Volume 8

Front Cover
John Leeds Barroll, Susan P. Cerasano
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 1996 - History - 288 pages
Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England is an international volume published every year in hardcover, containing essays and studies as well as book reviews of the many significant books and essays dealing with the cultural history of medieval and early modern England as expressed by and realized in its drama exclusive of Shakespeare.

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Contents

I
9
II
11
III
19
V
49
VI
63
VIII
94
IX
119
XI
128
XX
231
XXI
235
XXIII
241
XXIV
248
XXV
252
XXVI
256
XXVII
264
XXVIII
267

XII
146
XIII
165
XVI
176
XVIII
211
XIX
228
XXIX
274
XXX
278
XXXI
281
Copyright

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