The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volumes 1-2; Volume 4; Volume 7; Volumes 10-11; Volume 16; Volume 18; Volume 20; Volume 22; Volume 27, Part 1; Volume 30; Volumes 52-53; Volume 56; Volumes 58-59; Volume 62; Volume 81; Volume 83; Volumes 101-102; Volumes 118-121; Volumes 124-125

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Found also in the House Miscellaneous documents of the 52 to the 56th Congress./ Each number has special index. Inserted in each volume: Additions and corrections ... Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1902./ Series 1,v. 1-53, series 3,v. 1-5, and series 4,v. 1-3 include "Alternate designations of organizations mentioned." /Vol 54-55 of series 1 (serial no. 112-113)"HAVE NOT BEEN PUBLISHED, AND NO MATERIAL FOR THEM IS IN HAND." cf. General Index, p. xi. Series 2,v. 1 (serial no. 114) with imprint 1894, was not issued until 1898./ Edited in the War Records Office, 1880-July 1899; in the Record and Pension Office, July 1899-1901 Robert N. Scott compiled and edited v. 1-18, 1880-87, and also collected the greater part of the material for v. 19-36, 1887-91. After his death in 1887 the work was continued by Henry M. Lazelle, 1887-89, and by a board of publication, 1889-99, consisting of George B. Davis, 1889-97, Leslie J. Perry, 1889-99, Joseph W. Kirkley, 1889-99,and Fred C. Ainsworth, 1898-99; from 1889-1901 edited by Fred C. Ainsworth and Joseph W. Kirkley. A digital reproduction made from a copy held by Cornell University is available from Cornell University's Making of America Web Site.
 

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Page 299 - On this, our nation's birthday, we declare to our foes, who are rebels against the best interests of mankind, that this army shall enter the capital of the so-called Confederacy, that our national Constitution shall prevail, and that the Union, which can alone insure internal peace and external security to each State, ' must and shall be preserved,' cost what it may in time, treasure, and blood.
Page 155 - Keyes. The commanders of these corps are, of course, the three highest officers with you, but I am constantly told that you have no consultation or communication with them; that you consult and communicate with nobody but General Fitz John Porter and perhaps General Franklin.
Page 60 - That no more than two army corps (about fifty thousand troops) of said Army of the Potomac shall be moved en route for a new base of operations, until the navigation of the Potomac from Washington to the Chesapeake Bay shall be freed from the enemy's batteries and other obstructions, or until the President shall hereafter give express permission.
Page 325 - I have the honor to be, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant...
Page 60 - That the force to be left to cover "Washington shall be such as to give an entire feeling of security for its safety from menace.
Page 61 - Move the remainder of the force down the Potomac, choosing a new base at Fortress Monroe, or any-where between here and there, or, at all events, move such remainder of the army at once in pursuit of the enemy by some route.
Page 299 - Attacked by superior forces, and without hope of reinforcements, you have succeeded in changing your base of operations by a flank movement, always regarded as the most hazardous of military expedients. You have saved all your material, all your trains and all your guns, except a few lost in battle, taking in return guns and colors from the enemy.
Page 155 - But to return. Are you strong enough — are you strong enough, even with my help — to set your foot upon the necks of Sumner, Heintzelman, and Keyes all at once? This is a practical and very serious question for you. The success of your army and the cause of the country are the same, and of course I only desire the good of the cause.
Page 233 - Jackson, it illustrates their strength and confidence. After to-morrow we shall fight the rebel army as soon as Providence will permit. We shall await only a favorable condition of the earth and sky, and the completion of some necessary preliminaries.
Page 321 - Not more than 5,000 of these have died, leaving 45,000 of your army still alive and not with it. I believe half or two-thirds of them are fit for duty to-day. Have you any more perfect knowledge of this than I have? If I am right, and you had these men with you, you could go into Richmond in the next three days. How can they be got to you, and how can they be prevented from getting away in such numbers for the future?